July 2008 Quit Smoking Articles



VACCINES AGAINST SMOKING, OBESITY AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE COULD BE DEVELOPED 'WITHIN THE NEXT DECADE'

Source: The Mail (uk)
Date: July 31, 2008
Author: Daily Mail Reporter

Vaccines against smoking, obesity and high blood pressure could all be developed within the next decade, scientists believe.

Anti-smoking vaccines are also undergoing human trials, this week's New Scientist magazine reports. In a U.S. trial of 300 cigarette smokers, 15 per cent of those vaccinated quit after a year of treatment.

RNew Scientist says: 'The second vaccine revolution will not eradicate killer diseases.

'It might, however, cut the death toll from problems, that, if untreated, will become some of the biggest killers of the 21st century.' Smoking vaccine full article.

HEAD-TO-HEAD STUDY RESULTS DEMONSTRATED NO SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE BETWEEN NICODERM(R) CQ(R) AND CHANTIX (VARENICLINE TARTRATE) IN LONG TERM QUIT RATES

Source: PR Newswire
Date: July 28, 2008
Author: SOURCE GlaxoSmithKline

New data published today in the August issue of Thorax shows no significant differences in 6-month and 1-year quit rates between the NicoDerm(R) CQ(R) Clear Patch and Chantix (varenicline tartrate) despite statistically higher quit rates for Chantix (varenicline tartrate) at 12 weeks. According to the official 2008 U.S. Public Health Service Guideline, longer-term quit rates at the 6-month milestone are the most predictive of long-term success.

The Thorax paper, entitled, "Varenicline versus transdermal nicotine patch for smoking cessation: results from a randomised open-label trial", reports on a 52-week study that is the first-ever direct comparison of the NicoDerm CQ Clear Patch to Chantix (varenicline tartrate). The study was conducted using an "open-label" design, meaning that subjects knew what medication they were taking. Though this design may have favored the new pill, Chantix (varenicline tartrate) did not demonstrate long-term superiority to NicoDerm CQ.

"This study confirms that there is no magic bullet when it comes to smoking cessation and that both therapeutic nicotine and Chantix (varenicline tartrate) demonstrate long-term effectiveness," Quit smoking patch and Chantix full article.

YALE STUDY SHOWS WHY CIGARETTE SMOKE MAKES FLU, OTHER VIRAL INFECTIONS WORSE

Source: EurekAlert
Date: July 24, 2008

A new study by researchers at Yale School of Medicine could explain why the cold and flu virus symptoms that are often mild and transient in non-smokers can seriously sicken smokers. Published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, the study also identified the mechanism by which viruses and cigarette smoke interact to increase lung inflammation and damage. Smoking and flu full article.

SMOKING CESSATION THERAPIES MORE EFFECTIVE THAN PLACEBOS

Source: EurekAlert
Date: July 14, 2008

Six treatments for smoking cessation perform better than placebos — including varenicline (Chantix®), recently approved for use in Canada — states a team of researchers from McGill University and the University of Montreal in an article published in CMAJ.

This meta-analysis of placebo-controlled randomized controlled trials totaling 32,000 participants found that varenicline, nicotine nasal spray, bupropion (Wellbutrin®), nicotine patches, tablets and gum helped people quit smoking. However, "despite the documented efficacy of these agents, the absolute number of patients who were abstinent from smoking at 12 months was low."

According to the authors, varenicline was about twice as effective as bupropion. Quit smoking aids full article.

SCIENTISTS UNCOVER THE GENES THAT CAN LEAD TO A LIFE-LONG SMOKING ADDICTION

Source: The Mail (uk)
Date: July 11, 2008
Author: Daily Mail Reporter

A particular set of genes can turn a teenager who experiments with tobacco into a life-long addicted smoker, research shows.

Around 40 per cent of people with European origins have 'high-risk' versions of the genes, which affect the brain's sensitivity to nicotine.

They are in danger of getting hooked if they start smoking before 17, scientists found.

Scientists at the University of Utah studied 2,827 smokers, taking DNA samples. They looked for changes in the genetic code, known as single nucleotide polymorphisms, linked to nicotine addiction. Smoking gene full article.

CUTTING DOWN ON SMOKING REDUCES RISK OF SURGERY COMPLICATIONS

Source: San Antonio (TX) Express-News
Date: July 3, 2008
Author: Wendy Rigby KENS 5 Eyewitness News

Dr. David Wagner, a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist, counsels patients about the benefits of quitting smoking before and after surgery.

"We recommend that our patients stop smoking as long as possible before the surgery, and then for at least a week after surgery," he said.

Cigarettes increase the level of carbon monoxide in your blood and decrease the level of oxygen. Decreased oxygen increases your chance of a heart attack.

Smoking can also slow sown surgical wound healing and even increase the risk of infection. Plus, smoking increases your risk of lung problems such as pneumonia.

Full article no longer available.

IS THE DAMAGE FROM SMOKING PERMANENT?

Source: TIME Magazine
Date: July 1, 2008
Author: Laura Blue

Tens of millions of Americans have quit smoking cigarettes. Thebenefits of quitting - no matter what your age - are prodigious. Risks of heart disease and stroke plummet. So does the risk of lung cancer, along with cancers of the mouth, throat, bladder, cervix and pancreas. But can the damage from smoking ever be completely undone? Norman Edelman, chief medical officer of the American Lung Association, explains. Smoking damage full article.

SMOKELESS TOBACCO PRODUCTS DO RAISE CANCER RISK
Subtitle: Snuff, chew shouldn't be viewed as a safe alternative to smoking, experts say

Source: HealthDay [HealthScout]
Date: July 2, 2008,
Author: editors@healthday.com

Smokeless tobacco products (STPs), which include products such as snuff and chew tobacco, do increase the user's risk of cancer --just not as much as smoking does.

So say researchers who examined worldwide patterns of STP use and the associated risk of cancer.

Reporting in the July issue of The Lancet Oncology, a team led by Dr. Paolo Boffeta, of the International Agency for Research on Cancer, in France, noted that STPs contain more than 30 carcinogens, including nitrosamines and metals.

Their analysis of studies from around the world found that STP users had an overall 80 percent increased risk of oral cancer and a 60 percent increased risk of esophageal cancer. They also had a similar increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. European studies suggest no increased risk of lung cancer among STP users, but American studies suggest an 80 percent increased risk of lung cancer, the team said.

Smokeless tobacco and cancer full article.

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